logo Welcome, Guest. Please Login or Register.
October 14, 2019, 07:25PM
Home Help Search Login Register
News: Visit a member's site: http://www.schachcomputer-oldieladen.com/ (ELO2100?)

  Chess Computer Community
  General Category
  Discussions about Chess Computers
(Moderators: Endspielgott, Overtom, bobosse)
  Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« previous next »
Pages: [1] Reply Notify of replies Send the topic Print 
   Author  Topic: Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems  (Read 816 times)
Chris
Guest

E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« on: January 16, 2006, 11:21AM »
Reply with quote


Quote:

Never get tired of looking at them Regards
Mike


Amen regards 

Chris
Report to moderator Logged
Mike Watters
Hero Member
*****

Offline

Posts: 1605



Another day, another blunder.

View Profile WWW E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2006, 04:08AM »
Reply with quote

Robert/Chris

Thanks for those posts. I remember now reading David Levy's book about the Chess 4.6/Robot demonstration on German TV. He gave credit to David Cahlander for the chessboard used on that occasion.

So Cahlander is the inventor of the board and Folwell possibly applied for the patent preparatory to Ave Micro Systems producing it on a commercial basis. Leading to this :-




and then this :-




Never get tired of looking at them Regards
Mike
Report to moderator Logged
Robert Weck
Hero Member
*****

Offline

Posts: 791



I love Boardnation!

View Profile
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2006, 02:47AM »
Reply with quote


Quote from: Chris on January 13, 2006, 05:12AM   

The only reference I have is in David Levy's own book "The Chess Computer Handbook" (which i'm currently using to write my own program!  ) in which he says under reference to Magnetic Sensor boards:

" A further improvement on the membrane board sensor technology .. is to use a chess set with magnets in the base of each piece, and with magnetic sensitive switches beneath each square of the chessboard. The program knows whether or not a particualr sqaure of the board is occupied by whether or not the corresponding switch has been activated by a magnet. Since the program knows which squares are occupied before a player begins to make his move, it can detect which piece the user wishes to move by noting which switch is next activated, and the square to which the piece is moved is the next one activated after that.

So far as I am aware the first person to design such a board was David Cahlander of Control Data Corp who designed a board to connect to the Northwestern University programs (CHESS 4.0, CHESS 4.1 ...etc) which run on CDC computers. The attraction of the magnetic sensory board is that the user is freed from the onerous task of pressing down the moving piece on the from square and the 'to' square. He simply picks it up and puts it down  and if the software is well written he can even slide a piece across the board wiithout the program getting confused by 'seeing' the piece move to several different squares during the course of one move. This type of board is extremely pleasant to play with and I would recommend the extra investment in a really well made wooden board for those who can afford it."

....the last sentence is just as valid some 25 years later! 


You absolutely right, Chris!


Thank you for this post, too!


Robert
Report to moderator Logged
Chris
Guest

E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2006, 05:12AM »
Reply with quote

Hi Robert 

Interesting post, thanks for this.

The only reference I have is in David Levy's own book "The Chess Computer Handbook" (which i'm currently using to write my own program!  ) in which he says under reference to Magnetic Sensor boards:

" A further improvement on the membrane board sensor technology .. is to use a chess set with magnets in the base of each piece, and with magnetic sensitive switches beneath each square of the chessboard. The program knows whether or not a particualr sqaure of the board is occupied by whether or not the corresponding switch has been activated by a magnet. Since the program knows which squares are occupied before a player begins to make his move, it can detect which piece the user wishes to move by noting which switch is next activated, and the square to which the piece is moved is the next one activated after that.

So far as I am aware the first person to design such a board was David Cahlander of Control Data Corp who designed a board to connect to the Northwestern University programs (CHESS 4.0, CHESS 4.1 ...etc) which run on CDC computers. The attraction of the magnetic sensory board is that the user is freed from the onerous task of pressing down the moving piece on the from square and the 'to' square. He simply picks it up and puts it down  and if the software is well written he can even slide a piece across the board wiithout the program getting confused by 'seeing' the piece move to several different squares during the course of one move. This type of board is extremely pleasant to play with and I would recommend the extra investment in a really well made wooden board for those who can afford it."

....the last sentence is just as valid some 25 years later! 

I think his games were v CHESS 4.7 in 1978.

Best wishes


Chris
Report to moderator Logged
Robert Weck
Hero Member
*****

Offline

Posts: 791



I love Boardnation!

View Profile
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2006, 04:20AM »
Reply with quote

Hello,


i found an interesting picture from 1978 on www.computerhistoy.org:

http://www.computerhistory.org/chess/viewAll.php?sec=thm-42eeabf470432&sel=thm-42eeac093cfe1&table=item_artifact


It looks to me, that there are LEDs on every field on the board of Chess 4.6.

I am not sure, if i'm right or how the input was done (maybe not yet with Reed-switches)

But even it were only 64 LEDs, i would find this interesting. It took commercial chesscomputer some additional time, to adopt this technology! When i look at Mike's timeline, it seems, that the ARB was the first one with this feature (Jan. 1980)

Does anybody know any details? I can only remember the famous game in german television, where Chess 4.x played against David Levy (ended in a draw)

There the moves were executed with a robotic arm. I think, it was about 1979...


Robert
« Last Edit: January 13, 2006, 04:38AM by Robert Weck » Report to moderator Logged
Mike Watters
Hero Member
*****

Offline

Posts: 1605



Another day, another blunder.

View Profile WWW E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #5 on: January 12, 2006, 05:07PM »
Reply with quote

Hi All

Here is a patent which could be relevant to the Auto Response Board. A patent application was made on 21st May 1979 by a Dale E Folwell of Placentia, California for a chess or draughts board with reed switches under the board activated by magnets in the base of playing pieces, and light emitting diodes on each square signalling moves, all connected to a computer opponent.

http://v3.espacenet.com/origdoc?DB=EPODOC&IDX=DE3019432&F=0&RPN=GB2051589&DOC=ce973ee58c45fcb8702cebab731ac19138

Using the Advanced Search facility I found Ron Nelson, Ernest Winkler (Scisys) and some Robot patents from Shanghai University amongst lots of weird and wonderful stuff. Use A63F in the International Classification box plus "chess AND ...." in Keywords.

All the best
Mike
« Last Edit: January 13, 2006, 01:43AM by Mike Watters » Report to moderator Logged
Jose
Guest

E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #6 on: January 9, 2006, 10:41PM »
Reply with quote

Hi ismenio,

your site i study from a to z a long time ago. It´s great!  Very interesting are the different figures from the CC1. There are many different versions and which version is the first, the most etc.

Many thanks for the Links.

Greets Jose
Report to moderator Logged
Ismenio
Horsie to pointy guy 6
Administrator
*****

Offline

Posts: 1753





View Profile WWW E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #7 on: January 9, 2006, 05:23PM »
Reply with quote


Quote from: Jose on January  9, 2006, 06:28AM   

Hi ismenio,

on which site can i for example search for ron nelson´s Nr. 1 patent? Greets José 


Hi Jose,

Olivier pointed out one on line resource I used.
Here are a few more:

http://www.us-patent-search.com/ (needs registration but it's free)
http://patft.uspto.gov/netahtml/srchnum.htm
http://www.european-patent-office.org/index.en.php

I have some details for the patent for the CC1, including some drawings here:
http://www.ismenio.com/fidelity.html
The number is: 828147

Regards,

Ismenio
Report to moderator Logged

Map of chess computer friends: http://www.frappr.com/chesscomputers
steffen
Jr. Member
**

Offline

Posts: 76

I love Boardnation!

View Profile
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #8 on: January 9, 2006, 12:33PM »
Reply with quote

Hi there,

thanks a lot for your research.

I tell you what stands written:

Ave Micro Systems, El Centro, California 92243
Model: ARB-1 (remark: ARB-1 is printed deeply) Serial-Number: 3911 (remark: 3911 is printed deeply)
Patent Pending 39760 (remark: the digits 39760 are handwritten)

Quite interesting.
Maybe we will be successful?

You know, my guess is that Ave Micro Systems invented the ARB-1, they had the patent and sold it to Applied Concepts.
But it´s only guess.

Best
Steffen
Report to moderator Logged
mychess
Full Member
***

Offline

Posts: 108





View Profile WWW E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #9 on: January 9, 2006, 09:37AM »
Reply with quote

Hi,

For Jose, www.uspto.gov(FREE), the patent number for the CC1 is #4235442.

I try to find AVE patent  with differents brand names (ave, arb,...) and with the city (El Centro), but I didn't found it.
This short number seems to be a Published Application(but  available only from 2001 to 2005), not a Patent number (like the traction wheels of Mr J. Ruggles, pat #1).


Olivier.
« Last Edit: January 9, 2006, 09:46AM by mychess » Report to moderator Logged
Jose
Guest

E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #10 on: January 9, 2006, 06:28AM »
Reply with quote

Hi ismenio,

on which site can i for example search for ron nelson´s Nr. 1 patent? Greets José 
Report to moderator Logged
Ismenio
Horsie to pointy guy 6
Administrator
*****

Offline

Posts: 1753





View Profile WWW E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #11 on: January 9, 2006, 06:16AM »
Reply with quote

Steffen,

Are you sure about that patent number? I really looked to me like a very low number. I did find a patent with that number but it's from the 1800's!!! I check different search sites and using ARB or Auto Response Board (even adding "Chess") came up with too many results to filter.

Also, was it in the name of Ave Micro Systems or an employee? For example, the CC1 can be found under the name of Ron Nelson and not Fidelity.

The 39760 is actually so old that I didn't even find a text for it, only a scanned document:



And the drawings from the document really have nothing to do with an auto-sensory board



Ismenio
Report to moderator Logged

Map of chess computer friends: http://www.frappr.com/chesscomputers
Jose
Guest

E-Mail
Re:Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #12 on: January 9, 2006, 02:37AM »
Reply with quote

hi Steffen,


i think you must pay for this information:
http://patents.cos.com/cgi-bin/search/main

Other results i did not get. Maybe it will help you.

Many greetings José 
Report to moderator Logged
steffen
Jr. Member
**

Offline

Posts: 76

I love Boardnation!

View Profile
Patent 39760 from Ave Micro Systems
« Reply #13 on: January 7, 2006, 11:45AM »
Reply with quote

Hello folks,

I can´t find the above US-patent Nr 39760 anywhere. Can anyone help me please?
It ist a chess computer bulit by Ave Micro Systems, based in El Centro California.
Somehow I think that THEY invented the ARB (Auto Response Board), and they registered it under patent 39760.
Please help me, maybe somebody can find the patent´s text somewhere.

Best,
Steffen
Report to moderator Logged
Pages: [1] Reply Notify of replies Send the topic Print 
« previous next »
Jump to:  

Login with username, password and session length

Chess Computer Community
Get your Ad Free Message Board at Boardnation!   © 2013 Boardnation  Web hosting by Nubis