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Matthew
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John Gilliland to Matthew Gillian
« on: January 6, 2008, 07:31:04 PM »
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Here is an excerpt from a book I am writing about my family, so it may be a bit disjointed to you.  I wanted to share another version of some research I have.  Hope it helps someone as much as this site has helped me!
- Matthew Gillian  drmatthew@charter.net


    The Gilliland surname is found as far back as the 1300’s in Scotland.  William Gilliland was born in Scotland in 1538.  One of his sons was James, born in 1568.  One of James’ sons was John, born in 1593.  That John had a son named John, but not a “Jr.”  John Gilliland (Iain MacGill'fhaolain) was indeed born about 1638 (in North Edinburgh, Scotland).  John probably grew up as a farmer and learned the leather trade as he went along. The story starts with the earliest mentioning of John in the Monmouth's rebels. Most likely, John fought in the 1679 Battle of Bothwell Bridge. The bridge, located in South Lanarkshire, Scotland is over the Clyde River, nine miles east-south-east of Glasgow.  This John had a son named John Gilliland in 1668.


“On June 22, 1679, the royal army under the command of the Duke of Monmouth moved against the Covenanters at Bothwell Bridge on the Clyde. The Covenanters after a stubborn fight on the bridge were routed by cannon fire, whereupon the King's forces crossed and soon dispersed the main body.”
From MacEdward Leach, The Ballad Book. Text, Scott, iii, 209.

This is where our family’s story of faith and family begins in America. Immigration documents show that a man named John Gilliland (b. 1668) was an alleged Covenanter, banished to the East New Jersey Plantations, in America. Vol. XI, of The Register of Privy Council, Edinburgh, states that, in 1685, John Gilliland, then a sailor, and his wife, Agnes Craige (she was from Ireland), and a newborn son resided in the coastal town of Saltcoats, Ayrshire, Scotland (which, oddly enough, overlooks “The Firth Of Clyde”). In May of that year, John Gilliland was listed as a Covenanter Prisoner in Edinburgh, or Leith Tolbooth to be exact, and was eventually tried, convicted, booted out, and subsequently escorted via sailing ship from Scotland. Leith is the port for the legendary city of Edinburgh.  [This information comes from a book titled; “Scots Banished To The American Plantations, 1650-1775”, by David Dobson, published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1983, page 57.] Those documents go on to state that John was banished and the family sailed from Leith, Scotland, June 25, to the East New Jersey Plantations, arriving July 30, and that he was under the supervision of Robert Barclay.  John was released immediately after an appeal, dated August 10, 1685, and came to the American colonies as a free man.

Genealogists, James R. Gilliland and Wayne Fourmont, have been working on this line for decades and provide the following account of the same story in their research:

John Gilliland, a deported Scot prisoner from Scotland who fought at the Battle of Bothwell Bridge near Glasgow, with other relatives and neighbors and friends.  He was captured and put in chains at the Tolbooth prison at Leith, Scotland.  He was sent there for being a covenanter (for not accepting the religion that England was trying to force upon them.)  Many were given the chance for their lives or some form of freedom, if they would denounce their religious beliefs, and swear their faith to the Church of England, and an oath to the King of England.  John Gilliland along with other Scots would not change their principles and were sent to the Kings Plantation abroad, never to return.  The men had their ears "cropped" and the women were burned up the face with a letter.  If they were to return they would face immediate death.  They were shackled and chained and were and were put below deck for the whole journey.  Hundreds would die during the long trips at sea.


Ships lists and various other official documents show that several members of the Scots/Irish Gilliland clan were not only sent to America, but also to Jamaica, Bahamas, Barbados, Bermuda, Dominican Republic, Virgin Islands, West Indies, New Zealand, Australia, Nova Scotia, and Canada.  In the United States, records show that New Jersey, Massachusetts, Pennsylvania, and South Carolina were the states where the Gilliland’s are originally located in the late 1600’s.  By the early 1700’s, Gilliland’s had spread to Ohio, Virginia, North Carolina, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Texas, Kansas, and Missouri.  By the 1800’s, the families had gone on to Oklahoma, Nebraska, Iowa, Wisconsin, Michigan, Kentucky, Illinois, California, Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, spreading out to all of the nation by the 1900’s.  By virtue of so many of the Gilliland clan being disbursed across the globe, many other races, creeds, religions and cultures have been “cross-pollinated” into our family.  This helps to explain an earlier statement I made about our being related to the whole world.  We have Native Americans, Afro-Americans, Aboriginal Tribes, Island Tribes, Asians, Various Scots/Irish clans, Europeans, Slavic, and etc, as part of our Gilliland roots and heritage on an enormous intercontinental scale.  That is something to celebrate and put our hearts around.  No family on earth is a “pure” race family, no matter which way you try to skew the facts.  If one digs into the genealogy long enough, one will find out that we are all connected on this planet.  That is a fact!

The following is a very short, direct paternal route from John Gilliland, to Matthew Gillian.
John Gilliland and Agnes had a son named Samuel Gilliland. He was born in 1685, just before the family set sail for America. The immigration documents show that Samuel indeed came to America with his family. Samuel was married, but his wife’s name is currently unknown.  John Gilliland moved from New Jersey to Virginia in 1740. John later moved back to New Brunswick, New Jersey in the 1750’s. Some records indicate that Samuel may have gone back to Scotland for a brief time in 1718-1720.

Samuel Gilliland and his wife had a son named Nathan Gilliland. He was born about 1721. Nathan married Jane Donahue about 1745 in Augusta County, VA. They eventually settled in the Pocohantas/Greenbrier county area. There are tax and deed records from Greenbrier County concerning Nathan and his family. In the Annuls of Augusta County, VA., we find under the date of May 18, 1783, that “Nathan is about to move out of the county.” This is most likely when he actually went to live in Greenbrier County. This area was only partially settled many years earlier, but, was still rugged Indian country, where there were many Indian massacres. In 1761, the entire settlement was virtually wiped out in the area. Only two men lived through it, except for some women and children who were taken captive. In 1766-1767, the then Governor of Virginia made a ruling that if any of the original settlers wanted to return and resettle in the lands beyond the mountains, they would not need to pay any taxes for 15 years. The records show a deed from December 2, 1785: from Patrick Henry, Governor of Virginia, to Nathan Gilliland, 580 acres adjoining William Poage, Charles Clendenand, and William Boggs. Nathan died in about the year 1788 or 1789. During his life, records show Nathan was an overseer and hired hand in building and maintaining a road from Young’s Mill to Buchanan’s Mill in Augusta County VA., on August 20, 1752.

Nathan Gilliland and his wife had a son named James Gilliland. James was born on March 16, 1749, in Augusta County, VA. He was married to (1) Lydia Armstrong, about 1770, (2) Jane Edmiston Smith, in 1819. According to Family Bible, and military records, James served 2 years, 10 months in the Revolutionary War, and was an Indian spy under Captain’s Hamilton and Renick, and under Colonel’s Lewis and Donally. He was denied a pension in Greenbrier County on December 17, 1833. The reason for the denial is unknown. James died February 14, 1844, in Falling Springs, Greenbrier County, WV.

James Gilliland and his wife had a son named James Gilliland Jr. James Jr. was born about 1786, in Greenbrier County, WV. He was married to Margaret Boggs in 1802. It is at this point, a very significant change appears in the census records and other documents: the last name of James Jr. and Margaret’s children is listed as Gillilan, instead of Gilliland, dropping the “d” at the end. James died between, 1840 and 1850, in Gallia County, Ohio.

James Gilliland Jr. and his wife had a son named David Gillilan. Once again, remember the “d” on the end has been dropped in the last name. He was born in 1818 in Ohio. His wife was Clarissa Carter Allison. They were married March 4, 1840, in Gallia County, Ohio. Census records show that David lived, in Walnut Township in Gallia County, all of his married life. His occupations were listed as a farmer and miller. Records indicate that his second wife may have been Angeline Ellis. They had a few children together as well, maybe from Angeline’s previous marriage. This is unclear at this time. David died in 1897 in Gallia County, Ohio.

David Gillilan and his first wife (Clarissa) had a son named Thomas Jefferson Gillilan. He was born May 20, 1847, in Walnut Township, Gallia County, Ohio. Now is where the last name changes yet again on census records and other documents. Thomas was married more than once, but not more than three times. His first wife was Mary Isabelle Richmond. His second wife was Hazel Mary Ward. His third wife was Elizabeth “Betty” Ann Fox. They were married on September 10, 1892, at Laurel Creek, WV. This was also Betty Ann’s second marriage, and Betty had a child named Dova Mae.  On a previously undiscovered legal document, I found that in 1896, Thomas Jefferson was still using the last name of “Gillilan.” Documents indicate, in 1900, Thomas is residing at 274 Green Sulphur, with his last name as: Gilland. In the 1910 census, he is listed as Thomas Gillian, living in Summers County, WV. Nonetheless, Thomas and Betty Ann had a huge family, to say the least. Thomas died August 17, 1927, in Sandstone, WV. The last name “changes” are still a mystery to be solved. Thomas Jefferson was also listed in various earlier census and other documents between 1860 and 1900, with the last names of Gilliland, Gillilan, Gillun, Gillin, Gillan, Gillen, Gillion, and Gillon, all with the same vital statistics showing him to be the same person. Keep in mind here, that a great number of the census takers themselves were nearly illiterate, and the handwriting, even worse. This could account for some of the spelling discrepancies.  T.J. Gillian had a whole passel of children (15 – 18, depending on who’s counting) during his career as an apparent “professional father.”  Thomas Jefferson Gillian died from a stroke at Ramp in 1927.

Thomas Jefferson Gillian and his third wife had a son named Oliver Clyde Gillian. He was born on October 14, 1896, Sandstone, WV. He married Anna Clyde Richmond in September, 1921 at Pearisburg, VA. He was a railroad brakeman for the C&O Railroad. She was a homemaker. “He-Clyde” died on June 8, 1961, in Sandstone, WV. Much is known about this bunch and will be lovingly shared later in this book, as well.

Oliver Clyde Gillian and his wife had a son named Oliver Jack Gillian. He was born on February 19, 1926, in Sandstone, WV. He married Garnett Elizabeth “Betsy” Meehling on July 25, 1952, First Presbyterian Church, of St. Albans, WV. “Jack” served in the U.S. Navy during, as he called it, “the big one” (WW II), as a Supply Clerk in the New Hebrides Islands of the South Pacific Theatre. He spent a short time after the service, working as a “track-dog” on the Southern Pacific Railroad in the Southwestern United States. Then, after attending Marshall University, he went onto work as a “Rigger” for the Union Carbide Corporation, Institute, WV, for 38 years, before retiring. He died on June 3rd of 2001, in Charleston, WV, following a massive stroke.  All of his children were present in the hospital room at his passing.  Betsy also worked at Union Carbide in the steno-pool when she met Jack, and then was the Church Secretary and Pianist at Highlawn Baptist Church until her retirement.  She died at home, on September 30th of 1996, of congestive heart failure and complications of diabetes.

Oliver Jack Gillian and his wife had a son named Matthew Richmond Gillian (that’s me). I was born on May 26, 1957, at Thomas Memorial Hospital, in South Charleston, WV. Most of my life has been spent as an entertainer/musician, radio personality, and part-time professional bum/B.S. Artist. (Sort of “quad-vocational”)  I married Pamela Lou Lester on June 6, 1981, in Hurricane, WV, and divorced in Anchorage, AK, on October 16, 1985. We have two sons, Bradford Michael Gillian, and Geoffrey Alan Gillian. I married my best friend, and love of my life, Jill Andra Keller, (A beautiful, spirited Missouri farm-girl) on July 25, 1987, at McHugh Creek State Park, outside of Anchorage, AK.  Jill Gillian has two children from a previous marriage, Jennifer Nicole (Anders) Giseburt, and Justin Kyle Anders, who is now officially Justin Kyle Gillian! 

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Kate
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Re:John Gilliland to Matthew Gillian
« Reply #1 on: January 7, 2008, 09:21:31 PM »
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Hiya, Matthew...

Thanks so much for giving us this preview of your book! Lots of fascinating stuff here. I want to review some of the early history you have here and ask some questions just to clarify in my mind all the connections. You wrote:

This is where our family’s story of faith and family begins in America. Immigration documents show that a man named John Gilliland (b. 1668) was an alleged Covenanter, banished to the East New Jersey Plantations, in America. Vol. XI, of The Register of Privy Council, Edinburgh, states that, in 1685, John Gilliland, then a sailor, and his wife, Agnes Craige (she was from Ireland), and a newborn son resided in the coastal town of Saltcoats, Ayrshire, Scotland (which, oddly enough, overlooks “The Firth Of Clyde”). In May of that year, John Gilliland was listed as a Covenanter Prisoner in Edinburgh, or Leith Tolbooth to be exact, and was eventually tried, convicted, booted out, and subsequently escorted via sailing ship from Scotland. Leith is the port for the legendary city of Edinburgh.  [This information comes from a book titled; “Scots Banished To The American Plantations, 1650-1775”, by David Dobson, published by Genealogical Publishing Company, Inc., 1983, page 57.] Those documents go on to state that John was banished and the family sailed from Leith, Scotland, June 25, to the East New Jersey Plantations, arriving July 30, and that he was under the supervision of Robert Barclay.  John was released immediately after an appeal, dated August 10, 1685, and came to the American colonies as a free man.

1) If I'm following you here, the John from Saltcoats is the same John Gilliland who, as a convicted covenanter, was banished to the New Jersey plantations in 1685, and this has been confirmed by a ship's manifest. This same record confirms that John sailed with wife Agnes (Craige) and newborn son Samuel.

2) I'm curious about the description of Agnes as Irish-born. I suspect she was Scots-Irish. Certainly there are many Craig/Craige families in the Saltcoats area.

Further you wrote:

The following is a very short, direct paternal route from John Gilliland, to Matthew Gillian.
John Gilliland and Agnes had a son named Samuel Gilliland. He was born in 1685, just before the family set sail for America. The immigration documents show that Samuel indeed came to America with his family. Samuel was married, but his wife’s name is currently unknown.  John Gilliland moved from New Jersey to Virginia in 1740. John later moved back to New Brunswick, New Jersey in the 1750’s. Some records indicate that Samuel may have gone back to Scotland for a brief time in 1718-1720.


1) Wow, all this moving about can be rather confusing. Yes, the name of Samuel's wife has always been a mystery and a bone of contention among researchers of this line. I'm hoping to find some answers to this long-standing mystery with a trip to Bath County, Virginia, so stay tuned!

2) Now this theory that Samuel may have gone to Scotland for a brief time around 1720 is intriguing. One has to wonder why he would have made such a trip -- perhaps to marry? Some records have Nathan, Samuel's son, as having been born in Ireland abt 1720. So we still have some unanswered questions with regard to Nathan's birth.

This is another record I've seen in some dispute:

Samuel Gilliland and his wife had a son named Nathan Gilliland. He was born about 1721. Nathan married Jane Donahue about 1745 in Augusta County, VA.

I know this particular record is oft-debated but it's one that I'm quite comfortable with. The old records for Augusta and the Scots-Irish settlement include many citations for the Donahos. Perhaps some of the confusion or difficulty in finding the proper records has to do with the various spellings I've found, none of which is DonaHUE. There were Donahos, Donahoes, Donaghes, Donageys et al in the Augusta records during the same period the Gillilands were settled there. Here's just one example among many:

Husband's Name: Hugh DONAGHE (AFN:GDCV-HL)
Pedigree
Born: Abt 1735
Place: Kelclief, Down, Ireland
Died:  5 Dec 1809
Place: 
Married: Abt 1758
Place: Augusta, Virginia
 
Father: John DONAGHE (AFN:GDCV-KX)
Family
Mother: Isabel HAMILTON (AFN:GDCV-L4)
Wife's Name: Mrs. Elizabeth DONAGHE (AFN:GDCV-JR)
Pedigree
Born:  Abt 1736
Place: Of Augusta, Virginia>
Married: Abt 1758
Place: Of Augusta, Virginia

If someone has a source that can confirm the marriage of Nathan to Jane or Jean Donahoe/Donahue I for one would really appreciate a citation.

Lastly, I'm going to pluck a bit from your other thread because the very idea may stand some long-held research on its proverbial head:

John was released immediately (after an appeal dated August 10, 1685) and came to the colonies as a free man. John and Agnes also had the following children: Samuel, James, John, David, and Hugh (?).

Um... WOW. Now I don't know beans about the Jersey line (of course, I didn't even realize it was my own) but aren't these names (sans Samuel) the same as the ones for the early Pennsylvania Gilliland line? What's the source for this information?

I think we need to call Paul in here with some DNA swabs in hand!

  -- Kate

Edited to add: By the way, I'm always open to changing my own records with regard to my family tree. I've had John, Agnes and son Samuel as emigrating from Saltcoats to Ulster, where Nathan was presumably born about 1720. Then I have the family emigrating to America around 1740, entering near York, PA. If these records are wrong I won't hesitate to make the corrections! As a novice I have a lot to learn and there are many folks out there whose years of research are deeply appreciated.
« Last Edit: January 7, 2008, 09:32:22 PM by Kate » Report to moderator Logged
Kate
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Re:John Gilliland to Matthew Gillian
« Reply #2 on: May 1, 2008, 04:57:18 AM »
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I'm wondering if any of the descendants of James Gillilan, Jr. (like Matthew or Bruce) can identify this member of your tree?

-- Kate

ATHENS MESSENGER, 14 NOV 1930
PLANTZ ESTATE MAY REACH $700,000 WITH POMEROY GETTING ABOUT ONE-HALF, By C. A. HARTLEY, Messenger Special Writer

   
  Pomeroy, Nov. 11, 1930. - The provisions of the will of the late Wyatt G. Plantz form the chief subject of conversation in Meigs County,  and especially in Pomeroy, the chief beneficiary. It is believed now by those in position to know that the estate will reach $700,000 and that fully half of that amount will go into the coffers of the village of Pomeroy.  C. E. GILLILAN, who inherits the First City Bank and its assets with the old
Plantz homestead, is a native of Pomeroy and is well past middle life.  He is married but has no children. He is now president of the bank with his associate, Otto Strauss as cashier.
Mr. Strauss is young, is married and has a wife and a small daughter.  The building in which the First City Bank is housed is at Court and Second Streets and faces the Courthouse. It is a three-story brick structure, and is a joint building, one half being owned by the Reed heirs and the other now by Mr. GILLILAN. It was erected in 1857 following a disastrous fire the year before, in which the Rathburn Bank, the predecessor of the present institution, was destroyed, as was the Reed Drugstore. The Darius Reed and the Rathburns joined in the erection of the structure.  These two institutions have been in operation since the erection of the building, members of the families succeeding each other as executives until the present. The Reed drugstore continues in the old name with one son, W. F. Reed, the owner, in charge.  The history of the Plantz and Daniels families, which formed the nucleus of the present fortune, would make an interesting reading as a business novel. The Daniels first began in a small way at Wilkesville, and later came to Pomeroy to begin business in a small frame building where they were located when the fire of 1857 destroyed the building.  The bank in the new building prospered and was changed from a national bank to a private unincorporated bank. There were several cashiers and presidents.  In time, the Rathburns withdrew and located in Chattanooga, Tenn., where the Lasleys and the Montagues also located. The First National Bank, much of the stock of which is owned by the family and that of Rayhburns in Chattanooga, was formed. Mr. Plantz was a large owner of the stock of that bank, as evidenced by his will. When the Rathburns and other affiliated interests went South, George W. Plantz, father of Wyatt, took charge of the bank here and at his death it was turned over to the son. The latter has made a will disposing of the largest estate ever adjudicated in Meigs County without the suggestion of a trust fund or trustees to check on the disposal of the assets.  The bequest of $31,000. to the Masonic Order at Middleport came as a complete surprise to the fraternity there, as they had no intimation of such a bequest. It will serve to pay a mortgage of $25,000 on their temple.  It is understood that the Masonic Order in Pomeroy which inherited $63,000 will erect a long-contemplated temple on a lot the order owns between the Courthouse and Pythian Temple.
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