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Kate
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From the Bookshelf
« on: December 18, 2007, 05:43:43 PM »
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In addition to the many family-specific references that contribute to the portrait of our Gilliland families, there are countless histories that help us draw a portait of moments in time and place. In doing so these chronicles can bring the names and dates to life and put a face on those who came before us.

One book I'd like to recommend is History of Women in America by Carol Hymowitz and Michaele Weissman.
       
Certainly, as family historians and genealogists we have too oft encountered our "Sarah Unknown" in the family tree. As women were often absent from tax rolls or nameless in a census, we can only wonder who these pioneeing women might have been. Who were these women, our Gilliland women, whose own family name might not be recorded on her tombstone, or whose legacy could not be cut by her military exploits? Who were these women who bore every hardship as they bore the generations to come?

This is certainly a book worth consideration for your home library and here's a peek at its contents:

(excerpt)
Founding Mothers

The fate of the European women who came to the New World in the early days of colonial settlement was a life of nearly ceaseless hard work. Many who came were already accustomed to physical labor. Those who were not quickly adapted. In a totally undeveloped and sparsely populated land, the labor of every able-bodied settler was desperately needed, and women's traditional work--providing food, clothing, shelter, and the rudiments of hygiene--was essential to survival.

The demands of the New World allowed colonial women more freedom "to do" than was often available to women of later generations. This latitude was the product not of ideology, but of necessity. Colonial society did not support the idea of equality between men and women. European men brought with them to America the tenet that woman was man's inferior. This belief in female inferiority, however, was minimized by the conditions of the New World. So long as the colonies remained relatively undeveloped, women enjoyed a limited kind of independence.

Women were an integral part of all permanent settlements in the New World. When men traveled alone to America, they came as fortune hunters, adventurers looking for a pot of gold; such single men had no compelling reason to establish communities. Women acted as civilizers for men living alone in the wilderness. Where there were women, there were children who had to be taught. There was a future--a reason to establish laws, towns, churches, schools. The organizers of Virginia understood as much when they sought to attract women to their colony so that the men who came "might be faster tied to Virginia." The laborprovided by a wife and children also helped transform the forest into farmland. In the early days of the Georgia settlement the proprietors advertised for male recruits with "industrious wives."

In many cases women emigrated together with men. Such was the case throughout New England and the middle colonies, where whole families often came in search of religious freedom. Elsewhere, particularly in the South, women had to be lured to America. Some colonies offered women the right to own their own land. Lord Baltimore of Maryland offered 100 acres for a planter, 100 acres for a wife, and 50 for a child. Women heads of families were treated in the same way as men..."


To read the complete excerpt and for ordering information, please visit:
www.randomhouse.com/catalog/display.pperl?isbn=9780553269147&view=excerpt
History of Women in America by Carol Hymowitz and Michaele Weissman
Publisher: Bantam Books
Pub. Date: September 1990
ISBN-13:  9780553269147

-- Kate



« Last Edit: December 18, 2007, 06:26:11 PM by Kate » Report to moderator Logged
Kate
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Re:From the Bookshelf
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2009, 03:40:51 PM »
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Here's an index to volumes in the collection of the LDS research libraries that contain Gilliland genealogical information:
http://templeready.net/Eng/Library/fhlcatalog/printing/subjectdetailsprint.asp?subject=228036&first=1

-- Kate
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Re:From the Bookshelf
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2014, 01:28:41 PM »
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    Spotted this book advertised at the site of the New England Historic Genealogy Society and thought the description was tantalizing, especially for those who enjoy some history with their genealogy.
    The book is of particular interest to those with ancestors in New England and if you're among them, I would highly recommend joining the NEHGS. The journal they publish is alone worth the price of admission.
Link: http://www.americanancestors.org/home.html

Here's the book now available:
Scotch Irish Pioneers in Ulster and America
Author: Charles Knowles Bolton, foreword by Marie Daly
Published: November 2013
Available November 2013.

Originally published in 1910, Scotch Irish Pioneers offers a systematic treatment of the migration of the Scotch and English from the north of Ireland to the New World in the early 18th century. Bolton details the conditions in both Ireland and New England prior to the group emigrating; the main players and ships involved in the movement; and ultimately where in America the Scotch Irish settled after arriving.

Appendixes include lists of ships from Ireland arriving in New England between 1714 and 1720; members of the Charitable Irish Society in Boston; existing vital records of towns in Ulster begun before 1755; home towns of Ulster families; and more. For people of Scotch Irish descent, this book provides insight into the historical context of their ancestors' early migration as well as resources to further their own genealogical research.


-- Kate
« Last Edit: January 16, 2014, 11:12:20 AM by Kate » Report to moderator Logged
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