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   Author  Topic: Paint  (Read 185 times)
Doo640ER
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Paint
« on: March 31, 2018, 06:07:58 AM »
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To all of you restoration gurus out there, how much paint does it typically take to paint a chassis and pair of skis? Not including the hood. I'm trying to figure out how much I need for my 67 Oly.  Is a quart enough?  I not trying to make a trailer Queen, just a very nice semi-restored rider. 
Thanks,  I know literally next to nothing about the different types of paint. RTS, urethane, clear coating,  Etc etc etc .
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67 Olympique 250
70 TNT 292 (slides)
70 Olympique 12/3
70 Ski Boose MK I
72 Nordic 640ER (2)
Chrystler Sno Runner (2)
81 Citation 4500e
02 Legend GS 600
2011 GSX LE 600 E-tec
Green and Gold
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Re:Paint
« Reply #1 on: March 31, 2018, 08:45:06 AM »
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When using an HVLP gun, single stage product (catalyzed enamel  Centari, Omni, Nason, Fleet Farm, Valspar), dark color over a darker (grey/black) primer, I plan on using 21 to 24 oz of unreduced paint for a complete chassis (pan, tunnel, bulkhead)  color coat.  This assumes two wet coat for coverage.    Depending on how well I spray on a particular day, I’ll wind up with a few oz left in the gun.    So keep a prepped skis/rear bumper or something around to run out the gun.    Or touch up rust spots  on the trailer.

One pair of skis, single leaf springs and spindles 5-6 oz unreduced paint.

6 oz for most slide suspensions.

I'd have everything prepped, mix up enough paint to do the chassis and skis, start with the chassis.    If you use it all up on the chassis no issues, mix more.  Don't want to run out with a partial item done.  By that time you'll be able to judge  how your coverage is going.  Easier to paint the entire chassis and only one ski, stop and remix, then finish the ski portion. 
 
Shot thru an HVLP, reduced 8:2or3:1 using a 1.8 needle/tip. On warmer days (or with the thinner paints--Nason) I'll switch to a 1.4 tip and a 8:4:1 reduction  Gun close to target.  If you're using single stage and wish to reduce the chances of orange peel (and you don't want to wet sand/polish) use the higher reduction and wait for warmer temps and slower evaporating reducer.  Above numbers are for two wet coats.  Some yellows/oranges I’ve used recently have required 3 wet coats for coverage.    These are for color coat-----primers/primer-surfacers are another matter

After you mixed, catalyzed, reduced and strained your paint, only pour 1/2 of it into the gun at one time.    That will help you get a feel for your coverage/usage rates.

No advice for base clear coats---would imagine coverage is different.  Probably use a lot more product with a non-HVLP gun also.

Anxiously awaiting paint season here in WI.  Redoing a GS1100ES and spent most of yesterday scrapping off a bad metal flake paint job from a front fender (plastic).    Paint was clear coated but not really hard.  Plugged up 60 grit sand paper so had no resort but to pull out a single blade razor and scrape.

Good Luck     


« Last Edit: March 31, 2018, 09:11:30 AM by Green and Gold » Report to moderator Logged
Doo640ER
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Re:Paint
« Reply #2 on: April 8, 2018, 07:26:18 AM »
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G&G,
Thanks for that vast quantity of information.   If I read correctly, one quart should be enough to do the chassis and skis.  I'm no painter for sure, I will be taking this to a local body shop for the blasting and paint work.  I have always read that a white primer should be used under the old ski doo yellow.  Now I just need to get the paint.  I haven't had much luck where I have looked so I may give the body shop the code that GaWajn supplied:

SHERWIN WILLIAMS brand : formula ... 135B-1387274-00 
It is a base coat.

Does this mean it is not a single stage paint?  i.e. not ready to spray (RTS)?
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67 Olympique 250
70 TNT 292 (slides)
70 Olympique 12/3
70 Ski Boose MK I
72 Nordic 640ER (2)
Chrystler Sno Runner (2)
81 Citation 4500e
02 Legend GS 600
2011 GSX LE 600 E-tec
Green and Gold
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Re:Paint
« Reply #3 on: April 9, 2018, 09:11:28 AM »
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Things often  get pretty loose with regards to the terminology surrounding automotive paints.
 
To me, RTS  means you pop the lid, dump it into a gun and spray.  With the exception off the shelf spray cans and a few custom mixing services (Vintage Sled Paint, Ddub and the like), these are rare for a couple of reasons.    What you’ll usually find are products (primers, primer surfacers, color/base coats, clear coats) in one can, with the other necessary components (reducers/hardeners/catalyst/flex-fisheye-gloss.dull) in another can.    User will have to mix all components to take into account shop temps, spray gun configuration, material being painted, etc.  Once a hardener hits the color the clock is ticking and it all has to be used or disposed of.

Single stage paints are things like acrylic lacquer and enamels that do not have to be clear coated.    Some of the enamels (not all) do not have to have a hardener added (think using off the shelf rust oleum).  You spray and wait a long time to dry.  Most (not all) can have a toxic hardener added to induce a chemical reaction to get the paint to set.    These can usually be color sanded/polished to work out imperfections like sags, bugs, orange peel, etc.….    Back in the old days you could also clear coat some (not all) of these. 

Another range of products are often called base/clears, 2 stage, 2K, etc.; you’ll hear different people use various terminology.      These color coats spray flat, dry quickly, and then clear coated as the color coat has no gloss.  These days some of the base coats are water born, some are still traditional solvent based.    They’ve had a hard time trying to make good a water based clear coats.  This class of products are typically more expensive (sometimes a lot more) than the single stage.  You can also paint quicker using these products, important if you’ve got a paint business.      If you have a paint projects that needs to be clear coated (if you’re adding pearls, some metallic, or want to attempt to seal in graphics/decals for example) this is often the only way to go anymore.

Color matching use to drive me crazy; realized one day that the stuff came from the factory with lots of hue variation.    I’ve had same model, year hoods (72 TNT F/as, 73-75 F/as) that when the OEM decals were removed for the first time the yellow underneath was different.      Some of it could be sun/UV damage thru the decals, but I think it more likely that Bombardier didn’t concern itself too much about color consistency between paint lots.
   
I repainted my father’s 1965 boat trailer back to its original yellow three years ago, and after 3 years of sunlight it’s a few shades different.    A lot of the sleds in the Midwest sat outside year round back in the day. 

Lots of rambling here, weather in Wis is in that transition zone where you can’t do winter/spring or summer stuff yet, so spending way too much time at the keyboard.  Good luck with the project. 


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69nordic
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Re:Paint
« Reply #4 on: April 11, 2018, 08:39:51 PM »
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great informative clear easy to understand post.
Thanks
Kash
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GaWajn
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Re:Paint
« Reply #5 on: April 12, 2018, 02:41:40 AM »
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The Sherwin Williams base coat number that you have is the first stage. In other words ... base coat / clear coat means 2 stages.

Ready to spray means already reduced (thinned) to the required level.

You may or may not need hardeners and/or other chemicals as recommended by your paint supplier for your particular conditions.

Lots of great info there Green and Gold!

Good luck with your projects.
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1970 Ski Doo TNT 292 Bogie (Restored)
1974 Ski Doo Elan (Habs - custom)
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